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Mu Shin Shodan Kata & applications w/Videos
#1
The single kata used by the Mu Shin Kwan forms the foundation of the entire system. Many of the martial arts forefathers stated that to know 'karate' (Kong Soo) only one form (kata) was necessary for a lifetime of practice. I've taken that to heart. I personally feel that today's modern arts have far too many forms and that very little understanding is put into each one. Instead, they are set to music for competition rather than understanding the catalog of techniques each represents.

In order to further distance MSK KSD from sport related arts, I use only one single form. It is divided into 25 specific movements. Each movement has a basic skeleton which is then tailored to each MSK KSD student.

I have decided to further divide the one form into 5 segments of 5 movements each. This enables the student to learn more dynamically as each segment can be trained as an individual sub-form (waza) with each movement having the option of individual drills. Looking at the Pinan katas, they are divided into Pinan Shodan through Pinan Godan. I am going to do the same for the Mu Shin form. This gives each segment its own identity and I believe promotes better learning. You will note that I'm using Korean terminology freely with Okinawan/Japanese terminology. That is by design. A quick look at my bio will reveal my training is multi-cultural. Therefore with this kata (form) I am giving the nod of respect to three of the cultures I've trained in. And in truth, all modern Korean arts come from Okinawa by way of Japan. I feel this gives my students exposure to several cultures in some small, but meaningful way. Feel free to change the terminology as you see fit to meet your school goals.

I will use this thread to list the base movements, interpretations, conclusions and any video or photos as I am able to include.

Questions and comments are welcome. I will create a separate thread for questions/comments so that the flow of this thread remains uninterrupted for purposes of review for members of the IKSDA.  Click HERE

Mu Shin Shodan:

  • Bow – extend stance with left foot - hands on hip forming a one-knuckle fist pointing slightly downward – thrust forward while stepping back with right foot – grab & spike.

  • With left foot, step forward-left 45 degrees – right foot drag follows to stable ready position – left downward, inside palm heel block – right knife hand/forearm strike – front kick.

  • With left foot, step straight forward - left arm elbow spike – chin jab – front kick.

  • With right foot, step rearward-right 45 degrees – left arm shield block – chin jab – front kick.

  • With left foot, step straight forward – double horizontal ram – front kick - return to ready position - bow.
Mu Shin Shodan - movement number one:

Bow – extend stance with left foot - hands on hips forming a one-knuckle fist pointing slightly downward – thrust forward while stepping back with right foot – grab & spike.


This first movement has two applications depending on the range. At typical arms-length the movement represents a downward strike (using a one-knuckle punch) into the soft tissue (abdomen or groin area) of an attacker. It can be a pre-emptive strike if appropriate as if standing with your hands on your hips in a non-aggressive posture trying to de-escalate an individual. It could also be used as a follow up strike to an attacker that has already been doubled-up from a previous strike.

From a grappling distance it becomes a defense from a front bear-hug style grab. Normally, if someone is going to attempt to grab you from the front in a bear hug, they've probably some type of wrestling background. They will also likely be at least as large are you if not larger. The general idea is to lift you off the ground and dump you on your melon. This defense starts by lowering your center of gravity (extend stance with left foot) to avoid being lifted off the ground. The hands on hips forming a one-knuckle fist pointing slightly downward attempt to break the hold the person has placed on you. Thrust forward while stepping back with right foot creates distance between you and the attacker while striking into the soft tissue of his/her lower body. A good spot is the area where the abdomen meets the upper thigh (in the crease).

Possible follow ups would be knee spikes. 



Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#2
Mu Shin Shodan - movement number two:

With left foot, step forward-left 45 degrees – right foot drag follows to stable ready position – left downward, inside palm heel block – right knife hand/forearm strike – front kick.


From striking distance;

Attacker is throwing a common linear punch at you. For the purpose of this example, we will assume the attacker is right-handed (which the majority of people are). I'm stepping off-center at a 45 degree angle to my left, which would be to the attacker's right. This brings me to the attacker's right side to avoid the punch. I use my left hand as an inside palm heel to deflect/block the punch. If I'm able, I will attempt to grab the attacker's right arm with my left hand if possible. At this point my 'belly- button' is facing the attacker's right side. Using my hips to generate power, is swivel my 'belly-button' to my left at 90 degree while striking the attacker with a knife hand or outside forearm. The target is the side of the neck/base of jaw area.

Follow ups can include grabbing around the back of the head after the initial strike, pulling down and delivering a knee spike. Or, a downward side kick to the back of the attacker's legs.

From grapple;

Lifting attacker's right arm up and over your head while ducking under and moving to their side/rear. Arm is then moved down and grasped to clear room for brachial plexus strike as per above.



Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#3
Mu Shin Shodan - movement number three:

With left foot, step straight forward - left arm elbow spike – chin jab – front kick.


From striking distance;

Can be used in response to an attack towards you, or as a pre-emptive strike if appropriate. Stepping straight into attacker and delivering a strike with the tip of the elbow followed up with a chin jab and front kick. The progression is a 1-2-3 where the natural body mechanics are being used against the attacker as they're being set up for the next strike.

From grappling;

Can be used to create distance between you and opponent during grapple be putting the elbow spike into attacker's sternum, throat, face to create distance/cause damage. Followed up per kata.



Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#4
Mu Shin Shodan - movement number four:

With right foot, step rearward-right 45 degrees – left arm shield block – chin jab – front kick.

This is a defensive movement for when you are attacked by someone throwing those wind haymakers and trying to run you over. It brings the arm up over the side and front of the head to shield it from damage to the front, side and back. In the case of shielding with the left arm, the right hand comes up around the face area to protect the right side of the head as well as being in position to counter-strike. The chin jab is a very good, all-purpose response from this position. The front kick being inserted to either push the attacker back if distance needs to be created or to further damage the attacker so that the attack ceases.

This can be done in the grapple as well with the chin jab being in an upward motion, which is quite effective and sets the attacker up for further strikes if necessary. The 'front kick' in this situation can easily be low and to the inside of the attackers leg to cause it to be forcefully struck out to the side or to the back of the attacker. In addition to being a balance-displacement movement, it can also inflict serious damage if that is a necessity.



Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#5
Mu Shin Shodan - movement number five:

With left foot, step straight forward – double horizontal ram – front kick - return to ready position - bow

A 'double horizontal ram' is simply bringing your arms up over your face/neck area parallel to the floor. You provide just enough space between your arms to allow you a field of vision of your attacker. Basically, you simply plow into your attacker's upper body area to forcefully push them backwards off balance. At the same time it protects your head and upper body area from any incoming strikes. I is also a good pre-emptive strike should that necessity arise.

I can also be done from a grapple to give you space/distance for follow up strikes.



Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#6
Mu Shin Nidan - movement number One:

With right foot, step rearward right – left downward hammer fist/right hand head cover – upward elbow – back fist/back of forearm – sidekick.


This is a defensive movement. Here are a couple of possible circumstances in which this defense could be applied;
  • Your facing two or more individuals that are in your front arc at differing angles.
  • Your grappling someone.
For the purposes of offering a description, I've listed the right foot steps rearward and the left fist is striking with a hammer fist. It could just as easily be reversed.

The rearward step is to gain a position of stability where the strike gains the power necessary to elicit the prescribed response. That's the nice way of saying that it causes enough damage to allow you to continue a defense or ends the situation and you can disengage.

The hammer fist can best be thought of as a 'down block' movement such as performed during a line drill. As you are striking to the attacker's lower body (i.e. groin area) you can pivot your hips appropriately to allow an effective strike.

After you've connected with the individuals groin area, the probably, natural reaction is that the upper body pitches forward slightly. Bring your elbow straight up under the chin of the attacker at this point. If you connect then it's icing on the cake. If you miss you've still obtained a position with your arm that you can do a follow up strike such as a back fist or outside forearm strike to the side of the neck or side of the head.

The conclusion is of your choice and plays to your strengths. I've listed a side kick and that is fine and applicable. But play around with all of these movements to see what fits you the best.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#7
Mushin Nidan movement number two:

With right foot, step forward-right 45 degrees – left forearm strike to attacking limb – right forearm strike to upper torso– vertical elbow – hammer fist – horizontal elbow – back elbow – side kick.

This movement is predicated upon the attacker using a haymaker style punching attack. To facilitate this, the defender keeps their hands up in front of their bodies in such a way as to present a non-hostile appearance, but at the same time presenting an obstacle that encourages the attacker to punch 'around' rather than 'through'.

As the attacker swings the haymaker style punch in an arc, the defender lunges forward to intercept. Assuming the attacker is right-handed for the purpose of detailing the movement, his right arm is travelling in an arc. As the defender lunges forward, their left forearm intercepts/strikes into the area of the upper right arm of the attacker, preferably the bicep as it is a soft target that is painful when struck hard. Simultaneously the defender's right forearm is striking into the upper, right torso area of the attacker, preferably in the area of or on the collar bone. This area has a mass of nerves running below it and is not that difficult to fracture. Both areas are struck using explosive forward momentum while keeping the hands and lower arms at an angle greater than 90 degrees from the elbow.

This movement is designed to stop the punch as well as inflict pain/damage the arm and torso area of the attacker. It is also designed to either stop the forward momentum of the attacker and/or force them backwards to off-balance them.

The next movements are predicated upon the bodily response of the attacker after the initial double strike. If they are knocked off-balance backwards then a different set of follow ups can be applied. The following are designed to be ONE possible series of responses if still in close proximity of the attacker to show the rapid succession of counter-strikes possible to overload the OODA loop of the attacker.

Using the CWCT (closest weapon closest target) principle, the right arm delivers a right vertical elbow strike. This forces the attacker's head up. A downward hammerfist is then used which brings the attacker's head down. A right horizontal elbow strike can then be employed followed by a reverses elbow strike. This can be followed up by any number or locks or throws.

Keep in mind that the above demonstrates a series of five successive strikes that are delivered in rapid succession. At any point, the threat the attacker poises may be eliminated, which would stop the need for further strikes. The drill is designed to show that a large number of strikes/counter strikes MAY be needed, depending upon the situation.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#8
Mushin Nidan movement number three:

With right foot, step back right 45 degrees – left circular outside block/right palm heel block – left front kick – side snap kick and plant foot.

This movement can be used if someone is punching at you, reaching for you or from grappling. We're going to step backward at a 45 degree angle to create distance between us and the attacker. The step can be either left or right and should be trained on both sides. For the sake of a description I've used the right. At the same time as we're stepping back to create distance, we are attempting to intercept/block or move the limb that is punching, reaching or grasping us.

Although I've listed the left block first, it actually will be secondary to the right palm heel block. For the sake of an example to put the words into a picture, imagine that you're standing with a person grabbing your left shoulder with their right hand. As you step back to your right at a 45 degree angle you are attempting to do two things: First, create distance. Second, if his grasp remains on you, to pull him forward off balance. All of this will happen quickly of course. Now, using your right hand as a palm heel strike, you strike his right arm (that is grabbing you). The strike can be anywhere along the attacker's arm, depending on the distance created. Ideally it will be to a more sensitive area that allows for the greatest amount of injury/pain to be inflicted. Almost simultaneously, but secondary to the palm heel strike, you use the circular 'block' with your left hand in a fashion that is really a circular/outward knife hand strike. Again, this is to the grasping arm...if it is still grasping you. Ideally it allows you to target a different area of the arm than was previously struck with the right palm heel. You can also use this strike to set up a grab to either balance you for the follow up kick and/or allow you to set up an additional movement/lock/throw etc.

Front kick with the front foot, ideally to waist or lower height. Follow up with a right side snap kick to the attacker's knee or common peroneal (side of the thigh) to inflict muscular disfunction and fluid shock.

This foot should be planted directly behind the attacker's left foot to allow you to be close to and on the side of the attacker. This allows you to set up additional follow up strikes or movements such as locks, throws etc.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#9
Mushin Nidan movement number four:

Step left 90 degrees – left palm heel block/right circular outside block – right snap kick – right side kick.

This is very similar to Mushin Nidan number three. Rather than stepping backward to create distance, we are moving laterally to the outside of the attacker. From striking distance we are then utilizing a kick using the same foot twice. Once as a front snap kick and then turning whilst rechambering the foot for a second side kick.

From a grapple we are setting up the same kicks but can also attempt to continue to hold the attacker's left arm to both balance our kicks as well as set them up for an appropriate follow up/conclusion.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#10
Mushin Nidan movement number five:

With right foot, step rearward-left 45 degrees – double forearm strikes to intercept incoming grappling attempt.

The attacker is attempting to shoot in on you to grab your legs and take you to the ground.  You sprawl with either (or both) legs and using your forearms you strike the attacker in a forward/downward motion to his upper body.  Preferably into his shoulder/clavicle area to cause pain/damage and force him downward and into the ground.  This leaves you on top of his back in a position of advantage to exploit with any reasonable and necessary follow up. 
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply


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