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Pangai-Noon.net
#1
Pangai-Noon.net
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#2
It is quite interesting, to me, to see the differences in how Sanchin kata is performed.  If you go to the kata page you'll see three different videos and there are some stark differences in form and function.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#3










Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#4
THE TRAINING STONES OF PANGAI NOON/UECHI-RYU KARATE
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#5
From an informative post on another board (several years ago):

Quote:Hello all. If I may, I’d like to offer a bit of information that I gleaned from the past 30+ years here with UechiRyu teachers here on Okinawa, and especially with my last teacher who was a direct student of Uechi Kanbun Sensei. Quite a lot of my information comes from the 1977 UechiRyu Kyohon (aka "The Big Blue Book"), reviewed, edited and finally approved by none other than Uechi Kanei Sensei (son of Kanbun Sensei). This is not to say anyone must accept my input. Feel free to accept or refute; I could be completely wrong, and will not debate.

First, “pangainun” (and its various spellings) is a descriptive phrase and does not exist as a single word in the Chinese language. The phrase expresses a concept of “half-hard, half-soft” but this does not necessarily refer to soft blocks with hard strikes, or half-tense and half-relaxed, etc. According to our contact in Fuzhou (where I am assured the dialect has not changed for many decades) the phrase describes the nature of a particular style of fighting, and applies to many such Chinese systems.

A thing that is “half-hard” is “tough”. A thing that is “half-soft”is “flexible”. The phrase “pangainun” implies “tough and flexible”, not the literal dictionary translation of “half-hard, half-soft”. It could well be used to describe tough love, a mental attitude, Michelin tires, or my homemade breakfast biscuits. In this case, it refers to a Chinese fighting system. Uechi Kanbun Sensei retained this description, which was seen on his dojo signboard in Wakayama (written in kana, not kanji). He often stated that it was not a name, but a description of the training. He did not use the true name but finally named the system “UechiRyu” around 1940, tactfully deleting public reference to the phrase “Pangainun”.

“Pangainun” has become widely accepted as a name today. The inference is that a style called “Pangainun” is ostensibly closer to the original system taught by Shuu Shiwa to Kanbun Sensei over 100 years ago as opposed to contemporary UechiRyu (2nd-Generation Uechi Kanei Sensei's modified style of his father's system).

Uechi Kanbun studied in Fuzhou from 1897 to 1907, then taught for three years before closing his training hall and returning to Okinawa. He was given a letter of introduction permitting him to teach what he was taught (we would consider that to be his teaching license today). One story has it that he tore it off the wall where it was framed and ripped it up when he decided to leave China. There are various stories about why he closed the school and left.

After he left China, Shuu Shiwa sent another of his students to teach in the same hall (which still exists). This new teacher taught some of the same things Kanbun Sensei taught, but was trained extensively in another system by Shuu who knew 17 different animals systems.

Kanbun Sensei often expressed his regret at not remaining in China long enough to warrant learning Suparinpe, which would have been the fourth and crowning kata of UechiRyu had he learned it.

It is possible the system taught to Uechi Kanbun Sensei still survives in China today (in part or whole), as Shuu Shiwa’s training lineage still exists. It wouldn’t be surprising to learn that many teachers and training halls have gone “undiscovered” by non-Chinese practitioners for decades; we have examples of old-style systems still quietly existing on Okinawa while being unseen by visitors doing research into the contemporary versions of those very systems.

I hope this helps more than confuses…

Seizan
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#6


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#7


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply


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