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Why Modern Karate Is Broken (& How You Can Fix It)
#1
Why Modern Karate Is Broken (& How You Can Fix It)

Karate is not broken. What is broken is some people's understanding of what karate is, what it contains and what it can do. 

From the article:


The original Karate techniques are not “lost”. 
They are still here – hidden in plain sight.
Embedded in conceptual time capsules known as KATA.[Image: Nakazato-Joen_bunkai.jpg]
And the key to revealing their secrets is spelled:

B-U-N-K-A-I
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#2
Very interesting article.  One part particularly stood out:

Quote:“The Karate that has been introduced to Tokyo is actually just a part of the whole. The fact that those who have learnt Karate feel it only consists of kicks and punches, and that throws and joint locks are only found in Judo or Ju-Jutsu, can only be put down to a lack of understanding […] Those who are thinking of the future of Karate should have an open mind and strive to study the complete art.”
– Kenwa Mabuni [1889-1952]


Quite a bit of true karate was filtered out and repackaged.  This is why I like to see pioneers such as Abernethy Sensei taking a more in-depth look at kata and bunkai and returning karate to it's roots.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#3
Sadly, karate will never return to it's original roots, for there are a number of reasons and the most prevalent is MONEY!..........In truth, at least here in the states, folks want instant gratification and praise. Hard work and dedication are curse words to the me generations and mommy and daddy of the, "my child can do no wrong" cadre, would fly into a rage, at the thought of their precious not being the focus of attention for all to see. This unto itself, has been a major factor in the advent of McDojos and fly by night instructors and even instructors who have no training what-so-ever, but have a prime location for their school. I thought at one time, when the BJJ/MMA craze went into full swing, that it would enhance the prospect of folks taking serious training, but it was not to be. The main thrust of that movement, seemed to center around the young 18 to 25 male testosterone laden that had delusions of making it into the UFC. It also opened up another avenue for those less than honorable instructors to offer up this training, after they either went to a weekend seminar or just watched reruns of the UFC. Bottom line to this rant............To some, going back is actually going forward, but to the vast majority, going back is just going back and it's worthless, at least to them...........
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#4
Some elements may have been lost from the bygone era of karate in Okinawa.  However, the move today by Ian Abernethy, Stuart Anslow, Simon O'Neill and others (including you and I) shows that there is a trend to know the depths of the arts (be it Karate, Taekwondo or Kong Soo Do).  Some have historical access to authentic bunkai.  Some reverse-engineer kata.  Either way I applaud the effort because it shows that many are indeed serious about their art.  Will a reverse-engineered kata produce the exact bunkai that was taught over 100 years ago in Okinawa?  Perhaps, perhaps not.  Regardless it develops and art more fully.

The 'me' generation has existed in every era.  Korean arts shows many you rank-shopped or otherwise did dubious things to gain fame.  But there were also serious folks that took the art to entirely new levels.  We'll always have the hobbyist and the serious martial artist.  Sure, the money is in the hobby arena.  But that doesn't diminish the serious nature of really getting down to the nitty-gritty of an art.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply


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