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How to Spar for the Street
#1
How to Spar for the Street Part 1
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#2
While I agree with much of what was offered, there are two points of contention. One, the term "fight" is overly used as a description for a self defense situation. I realize that it's used as a generalization, because perhaps there is no other simplistic term or one word to describe what will / should happen, but in my opinion, it's telling or offering the wrong application mode to people. A fight is deliberate combat between opposing people, which in essence, gives the opposing person the opportunity to proceed with a continued attack. In a real self defense application, allowing the attacker or antagonist the opportunity to be physical beyond a first move is the aspect of a fight. Stopping the attacker either before or immediately after a first move is self defense and not a fight. Two, the applications / techniques applicable for this differs greatly from any sparring practices that people currently do, for the term sparring allows for both parties to be in a continuous realm of give and take. The physical and mental composition of real self defense is both unforgiving and cruel and a person must have their mental aspect ready to deliver and deal with the effects of what will / should transpire.
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#3
I just had some new folks come into class from a sport TKD school. We talked a good bit about the difference in mentality between expectations of sport vs. self defense. For example, after evading a kick in sparring because of rules you kick at a targeted area legal to the rules whereas we teach to perhaps evade and kick the groin or break the knee. As sidekick said, one mentality is that there is an understood and natural give and take while the other is seeking to end it quickly by whatever means are necessary. I just saw an interesting expression that comes to mind: "If you find yourself in a fair fight......you have crappy tactics."
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#4
How to Spar for the Street: Part 2


This second part to the article talks about starting a 'sparring' session without warning.  By sparring he is referring to an unplanned attack that can come at anytime i.e. during a water break, in the middle of a drill etc.  This is a very valid tactic and can provide valuable training and feedback.  

I would also insert into the training the possibility of de-escalating the attack prior to it going hands on.  Not every 'attack' is a violent attacker looking to kill you.  Some situations may be simply an irate person having a bad day but a kind word or apology calms them down.  The best fight is the one that doesn't happen.  In this way, and if there is an opportunity, verbal skill can be practiced as well as physical.  It also provides training on when to try verbal and when not to attempt it i.e. don't give up a tactical advantage or put yourself in further harms way.

Abernethy Sensei makes valid points on escape/evasion at the end of the article as well.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#5
(01-12-2016, 04:16 AM)pennmartkd Wrote: I just had some new folks come into class from a sport TKD school.   We talked a good bit about the difference in mentality between expectations of sport vs. self defense.  For example, after evading a kick in sparring because of rules you kick at a targeted area legal to the rules whereas we teach to perhaps evade and kick the groin or break the knee.    As sidekick said, one mentality is that there is an understood and natural give and take while the other is seeking to end it quickly by whatever means are necessary.     I just saw an interesting expression that comes to mind: "If you find yourself in a fair fight......you have crappy tactics."


Abernethy Sensei touches on this in the second part of the article where he discusses not using trained responses in a street fight.  In other words, don't use sparring skill sets in a street fight.  Valid discussion.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#6
How to Spar for the Street: Part 3


They say a picture is worth a thousand words.  Here are two pictures that say much more than that and offer a stark representation in the difference between sport and street.

[Image: Street-Sparring-P3-1.jpg]


[Image: Street-Sparring-P3-2.jpg]
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply


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