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Practical kata bunkai
#1


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#2
Here are some of the points that I like about this video (and what Abernethy Sensei presents in general);  First, that kata isn't something you do with an opponent, it is something you do to an opponent.  There should be any back and forth, it should be you, in Abernethy's words, "dominating your opponent".  

Secondly, when karate (or any martial art) is presented in this fashion you'll notice it looks a lot like H2H combatives/gutter fighting.  In other words, it is chaotic yet fluid (not to be confused with choreographed).  It is violent.  It is force-on-force.  It is continuing until the threat has stopped (much like the way we teach firearms to police i.e. you continue to fire for effect until the threat has ceased to be a threat).  

Thirdly, it doesn't conform to an exact formula.  In other words, the kata shows a specific movement or series of movements to deal with a situation, but Abernethy Sensei flows from there with multiple follow ups.  Rather than 'high block, punch, punch and then kick' he may start off using the movements from the kata but is free to morph to the situation at hand.  The kata is a guide.  A catalog.  A template.  One should be free to improvise after the initial sequence of events.  His analogy of the alphabet is spot on and really explains what a kata is suppose to be and how it is suppose to be used.  

If you look at the demonstration portion around the 4:15 mark you'll note (for those that have taken or seen SPEAR) is that his initial double forearm impact is pretty much SPEAR.  This is a good thing in that it uses the flinch/startle response and is pure gross motor skill.  Nothing fancy and absolutely no fluff.  Simply good ole fashion force-on-force combatives designed to take out an attacker as quickly as possible.  Which is the goal.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#3
Exactly the type of bunkai we train but with the Goju kata.
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#4


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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