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Stuart Anslow
#1





I like Stuart and I don't want to sound like I'm judging too harshly.  But the 'attack' isn't very realistic.  Someone grabbing you from behind, as represented in the beginning segments of the video, are going to grab, lower their center of gravity and perhaps try to lift you up and throw you backward.  This needs to be taken into account in any defense.  Similarly, someone going for a one-arm choke, like later in the video, is going to pull you backwards off your center of balance which would negate many of the defenses shown.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#2
Not my choice as an instructional video. Some of the side choke defences are ok but the rear attacks are totally unrealistic.
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#3
I have two of his books, which I think are very helpful. These particular videos are less so.
Martial Arts done well leads to a more virtuous life because everyone is fighting something.

"If your eye is single, your whole body will be full of light.  But if your eye is evil, even the light that is within you will be darkness.  If the light that is within you is darkness, how great is that darkness?"  (Jesus of Nazareth)
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#4
(04-13-2016, 09:33 PM)Conrad Wrote: I have two of his books, which I think are very helpful.  These particular videos are less so.


Yes, I was a bit surprised at the videos to be honest.  Not a good representation of what I've come to expect from him.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#5


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#6
In the above video I like the following:

0:22 - A straightforward and practical application.  Double 'block' the incoming punch and use a knife-hand or outside forearm to strike the side of the neck.  Appropriate follow up such as the kick demonstrated.

0:27 - Not a bad response as long as one is adept at kicking, and kicking quickly.  The ridge hand is a good move against the back of the head.

0:45 - Similar to the first application above, the CQ elbow strike is one I prefer.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply


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