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How much time for a beginner to practically use your system?
#11
(04-21-2016, 01:50 PM)Kong Soo Do Wrote: I have link to several of his articles that I'm going to put on the board.  Do you have a specific link to the 5-minute methodology?  I'd very much like to take a look at that if you have a link handy.  Thanks.

Smile

To be honest I don't remember but it may have been in the PPCT instructor manuals, which I no longer have. I just grabbed "Sharpening The Warrior's Edge" and on page 21 he writes that the student should be able to learn the skills in less than 3 minutes or 25 repetitions. So, I may have been mistaken on the time but I think it may be further discussed in the PPCT manuals. I don't know if there are any online articles that mention it.

Steve
"Personal safety is a way of life, not just a hobby!" ~Steve Zorn
Personal Safety Unlimited
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#12
I mentioned earlier that I have two new guys (both about 40) who have now been training with me for just four sessions (2 hours per week) in private lessons, neither with any previous experience. It is very interesting to see just how far they have come in such a short time. I believe they could both give a good account for themselves if they were attacked. I think this stems from the type of training. Okinawan karate and Krav are very similar in concept and the way they are trained. They are both very much hands on, 'engage and destroy', type systems.

The Japanese karate and Aikido that I have also trained have a totally different philosophy, especially the Aikido. I fear using them in a violent scenario without years of training would lead to tears.
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#13
Tony Blauer, the creator of the SPEAR system once told me about an incident he had with an Aikido instructor.  The Aikido instructor was angry with Tony saying that NO ONE could learn to defend themselves in as short a time as Tony espoused and that it took him 20 years to get someone proficient enough in Aikido to practically use it.

Tony looked him in the eye and simply said, 'don't place your limitations on me'.  And he turned around and walked away.

There is some truth to that simple statement.  If a martial art takes 20 years to become proficient in to the point you can practically use it for defense...it isn't really much of a martial art.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#14
(05-27-2016, 01:35 PM)Kong Soo Do Wrote: Tony Blauer, the creator of the SPEAR system once told me about an incident he had with an Aikido instructor.  The Aikido instructor was angry with Tony saying that NO ONE could learn to defend themselves in as short a time as Tony espoused and that it took him 20 years to get someone proficient enough in Aikido to practically use it.

Tony looked him in the eye and simply said, 'don't place your limitations on me'.  And he turned around and walked away.

There is some truth to that simple statement.  If a martial art takes 20 years to become proficient in to the point you can practically use it for defense...it isn't really much of a martial art.

One of the first things I teach my students is Tony Blauer's "open 90" concept.  It's concept is not really different than a simple tsoo-do.
Martial Arts done well leads to a more virtuous life because everyone is fighting something.

"If your eye is single, your whole body will be full of light.  But if your eye is evil, even the light that is within you will be darkness.  If the light that is within you is darkness, how great is that darkness?"  (Jesus of Nazareth)
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