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Pressure Points: A Sceptical Examination
#1
Pressure Points: A Sceptical Examination
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#2
Ki of Chi is whatever it means to you. I have seen too much to say "there is no such thing as Ki (or Chi)". I have no concept of energy working through meridians but certainly many of the points along those meridians are very effective targets for various attacks whether that be strikes, pressure or rubbing. To me, Ki is all about the mind. Mind and body together gives strength. Remove Ki and the body is weak. Only people with no first hand contact with Ki would dismiss it out of hand.
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#3
There is something to it.  Unfortunately the fact that there is something to a lot of things that are hard to quantify leaves people easily manipulated or taken advantage of.

One book I read, totally unrelated to martial arts, is this:

The Body Electric

Understanding that there is an "electrical" component to the body is one less mystical way to apprehend something like "chi."
Martial Arts done well leads to a more virtuous life because everyone is fighting something.

"If your eye is single, your whole body will be full of light.  But if your eye is evil, even the light that is within you will be darkness.  If the light that is within you is darkness, how great is that darkness?"  (Jesus of Nazareth)
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#4
In reading the link, I have to agree with just about everything offered. Now regardless of what one wishes to call it (Ki / Chi) it is all about the melding of mind and body as Kman stated.

As to pressure points unto themselves, everybody is different and what may work on someone, not under stress, may not work on another. But now add stress, which includes an adrenaline dump and the picture changes drastically. There are / have been some folks that have made a nice living from offering seminars on both the chi and PP connection and in all honesty, have actually done a dis-service to those in attendance.

Real combat / fighting is at best, a temporary act of going brain dead and falling back on ingrained reactions. There is no time to reflect and think about what your doing, for if you do, you'll lose or become dead!

Now, perhaps here is where the optimum difference between fighting and self defense comes into play. In a fight / combat situation, if you haven't had a time element of leading up to a physical altercation, you are going to just react. In SD, there will be most likely that time before element, where you will have the opportunity to access the situation, before physical action is called for. Granted, they can both be intertwined to a degree, but there are differences. Now to also interlace the actions of the person who's confronting you, this also plays directly into a ki or chi factor if you will. If the person attacks, then his ki/chi - really adrenaline, is hyped/dumped and your response to this is mitigated by this fact. Now if there is a time equation, as he's talking / threatening, his dump has not happened and your response will be more effective. Granted, I will concede that there is a thin line between the two, but there is that line that affords you the difference in your response and a major difference is that you have the option to strike first.
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#5
(06-20-2016, 08:01 PM)Conrad Wrote: There is something to it.  Unfortunately the fact that there is something to a lot of things that are hard to quantify leaves people easily manipulated or taken advantage of.

One book I read, totally unrelated to martial arts, is this:

The Body Electric

Understanding that there is an "electrical" component to the body is one less mystical way to apprehend something like "chi."


Agree that the body does indeed have an electrical component that makes it operate and function.  Perhaps some can manipulate this to some extent, perhaps not.  I agree with GM Dunn that in the heat of combat is a poor time to try to find out if you can actually use something or not.  

Have I used pressure points on people in certain situations outside of class?  Yes.  It works on some people and on others it doesn't, same with most techniques.  There are situations that aren't full blown knock-down-drag-out fights where one can have the opportunity to manipulate a joint or a pressure point or need to inflict pain without inflicting damage.  I do this regularly with come-along holds to move a bad guy (prisoner or inmate) from one place to another.  Quite different than pointing at someone across the room and they fall down.

Wink
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#6
some pressure points lets face it are difficult to get to because in a real fight your bodys chemistry changes and fine motor movements go out the window, plus you are if you are striking trying to hit a moving target while hitting for the most part points that are usually small surface areas. Thats not saying you can't hit them or practice to be better at it. I know pressure points work but their are factors, one adrenaline,two are they on opioids,alcohol, or other drugs. three for some joints people are double jointed while a past injury can cause nerve damage that can effect your technique on them different. four are you using the point correctly meaning is it a rub point, do you have the direction,angle,pressure correct to get a response. several factors can work against you but if you break bones your stopping for sure that persons limb, if you strike and damage soft tissue like the eyes well that probable will keep him from seeing you so in my mind pressure point are good but vital striking points and bone breaks are the best. I love to look at some of the kempo techniques as they strike the person five or more times mostly to pressure point targets and think to my self do you really think that person is going to stand their like a statue the hole time an let you keep striking at him. In real fighting your lucky to get more then two strikes in a combination on a person because people shift their feet they go a few inches to the left or back wards or forwards and they will cover up so my reason for rambling is don't relay on pressure points to much and remember if you can end the fight quick do so by striking targets to damage them.
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