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Principles, Analysis, and Application of Effortless Combat Throws
#1
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I purchased this book quite a few years ago and found it an excellent read with a lot of in-depth concepts that can be applied to most any martial art.  I've enjoyed Tim Cartmell's books and videos for years and find him to be quite knowledgeable on a variety of principles within this segment of the martial arts. 

Small example of what's in the book:






[url=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0865681767/qid=955766222/sr=1-1/104-8764813-9964413][/url]
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#2
Principles, Analysis, and Application of Effortless Combat Throws
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#3


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#4
Haven't read the book, but from experience I've noticed two things. First, the easy way for an effortless throw is a cooperative partner. Second, the biggest key to effortless throwing is reading the opponent's energy and then harmonizing it, which requires sufficient training to be familiar with a range of techniques and be able to move fluidly between them.
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#5
I understand what you're saying about a cooperative partner.  And of course that is one of the things I tend to rail about against McDojo/McDojang teaching.  However, there are principles that allow you to use 'effortless' applications against violent attackers.  The term 'effortless' needs to be clarified in that you will need to use some force, but if you're trying to muscle these principles then they aren't being done correctly.  

I've used these many times and when I became a PCR instructor it was the bulk of the class.  And though it could be considered a 'soft' approach it was the most painful class I've ever taken.  40 hours of pain and that isn't a joke or exaggeration.  I prefer these principles because sometimes force-on-force just isn't going to get it done.  Particularly on pysch individuals that have superhuman strength and don't feel pain.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply


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