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Hapkido for Law Enforcement Officers
#1


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#2
Sadly, how law enforcement responds in this country is determined by risk assessment management and not what could work for the individual officer. Any and everything that was shown in that video, would be construed as police brutality, even though the bad guy was / is still alive.
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#3
All depends on how proactive the department wants to be.  I didn't think they'd approve SPEAR for our agency...but they did.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#4
From what I've seen, granted just locally with the surrounding departments, being proactive with hands on physical techniques is not on their agenda. Now they have allowed a fuller use of the baton, but they haven't gone into a better teaching mode, just a memo saying you can use it more. Have had officers from 4 or 5 agencies that wanted some training for themselves, but stipulated that their particular department would not be receptive to what they were being taught.

Now on the other hand, would really like to see the SPEAR curriculum. Any chance you could find some footage?........
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#5
Thanks for sharing the video.  Some of the techniques are ones I and my class already do, so this video gives us easy applications/bunkai of the shown techniques.
Martial Arts done well leads to a more virtuous life because everyone is fighting something.

"If your eye is single, your whole body will be full of light.  But if your eye is evil, even the light that is within you will be darkness.  If the light that is within you is darkness, how great is that darkness?"  (Jesus of Nazareth)
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#6
(08-29-2016, 03:56 PM)sidekick Wrote: Now on the other hand, would really like to see the SPEAR curriculum. Any chance you could find some footage?........

Take a look in the SD section.  Tony Blauer is the pioneer of the system which is based on the flinch response and gross motor skills.  He touches on it a bit here an there in some of the videos.

I'll try to verbalize one of the drills.  First, the hands are up and out in front of you, palms open/fingers open, in a non-threatening posture such as you might do when saying, 'get back'.  This does a few things;  It gets your hands up and ready for defense/offense depending on the situation.  It 'looks' non-threatening so that you don't look like the aggressor or 'bad guy'.  Very important in this video-happy day and age.  And it puts a barrier between you and the aggressor so that he is less likely to come straight in or do a straight punch or jab and 'forces' him into throwing a haymaker.  By 'force' I'm mean it's psychological that they don't want to punch 'through' your hands but rather go around the obstacle.

The haymaker is what you're looking for in their movements.  You want to lunge forward, off your back leg and straight into them.  Your hands/arms come up and you strike them with the outside of your forearms while keeping your arms greater than 90 degrees at the elbow.  Your targets are the bicep area and the collar bone area.  Think of it as jamming your arms into these areas as they're swinging at you.  You keep your head down inside your arms.  This stops their forward progress, stops the punch and causes damage to softer areas on their body.  

Here is an example of having the hands initially in front of the body:

[Image: Spear-Guide-Cover-150.jpg]

This is 'kinda' what I'm talking about of jamming the haymaker.  Note the elbows need to be greater than 90 degrees at the elbow.  This pic is more of the attacker trying to shoot in a grab you but the principle is the same i.e. jam his forward progress with the outside of your forearms against weak areas of his body (biceps, collar bone, side of neck etc).

[Image: d86c9475107b59b38ff83080ebd629a9.jpg]


Here's an example:

[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTGCMLZMKTNkLOExgtL77o..._nGWnnXlCg]

This is a static picture and of course doesn't reflect the dynamic force-on-force nature of this particular response.  From that initial 'defense' you can do a plethora of follow ups;

[Image: tony-blauer.jpg]

[Image: blauer-spear.jpg]

[Image: images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTG8QWGmrYkrHFlNvVl4_4...fbKi5t9JNg]
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#7
Here are some of the concepts in the video.  Note that around 3:00 mark is sorta what I've described above.



Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#8
I like the video. Was at a seminar a while ago where a similar concept was taught to drive forward with a similar posture and the idea was that the initial response is to stop/survive the initial attack. Once that is weathered, then other skills to subdue or disable come into play, but the full thrust of the session was about simplified, effective, response. If you don't survive the initial attack, follow up isn't an option(kind of like his horse stance illustration in the video).
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#9
(09-06-2016, 12:10 PM)pennmartkd Wrote: I like the video. Was at a seminar a while ago where a similar concept was taught to drive forward with a similar posture and the idea was that the initial response is to stop/survive the  initial attack.  Once that is weathered, then other skills to subdue or disable come into play, but the full thrust of the session was about simplified, effective, response.   If you don't survive the initial attack, follow up isn't an option(kind of like his horse stance illustration in the video).


Bingo!
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#10


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply


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