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Practical TKD applications
#1


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#2


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#3
One of the things I like about this guy is that he recognizes that the forms are a model and guide that can be interpreted beyond exact rote repetition. He changes targets and adapts motion as well. We need more of this kind of stuff out there. Especially given the most recent Olympic embarrassment.
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#4
Agreed.  I find far too often that people expect the actual movements to mirror the form exactly.  And that just isn't realistic or practical.  There are going to be variations on the theme by necessity of the fluidity of movement of both the defender and the attacker(s).  The form is there to convey a principle, concept, strategy or technique and not a rigid, prescribed set of exacting movements.

Nice that it seems to be a growing trend in TKD towards practical, realistic self-defense.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#5
(08-15-2016, 11:43 PM)Kong Soo Do Wrote:



The movement at 0.09 is a simple, but effective movement.  Simple gross motor skill palm heel block and then some form of strike to the groin area.  This can affect the OODA loop of the attacker and/or injure them and/or stop their aggression.  It also opens itself up to several types of follow up action.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#6
I just visited a friend's TKD school while I was on vacation. He does a sport/SD mix. After seeing the Olympics this year he said to me "so are you still going to call what you teach Tae Kwon Do?" I think the Olympics is having a dual affect for TKD. For some who don't take it seriously, it detracts even more from the art, making it silly leg flipping. For others it drives us further into wanting to give it the solid, practical reputation it deserves when taught correctly.
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#7


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#8
I am glad that this guy was not at the tournament last saturday for I don't think I would have come home with that 1st place trophy in the self defense division.
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#9
Maybe we'll see him on dancing with the stars next season......................(sarcasm extreme)
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#10
Some of it wouldn't work of course against a resisting, violent opponent.  But some of what was offered had value.  I particularly enjoyed the very first technique i.e. going under the grab and sweeping the attacker.  Simple and effective.  I'm not a fan of jumping up and wrapping my legs around the attacker and going to the ground for the obvious reason(s) i.e. going down on a soft mat is one thing, going down on asphalt is quite another.  But some of the less flashy stuff had some merit.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply


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