Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Fight Stoppers
#1
Exclamation 


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#2





I like this guys presentation.  Not only was he explaining his go-to move but also aspects that were equally important;

  • Open hands vs. closed fists from a legal perspective i.e. you don't want to look like the aggressor and assume you're on video.  Good advice.
  • Chin jab using the palm heel strike.  Right out of Fairbairn's WWII combatives.  Simply, effective, gross motor skill based and works.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#3
Watched a couple of these videos and while I agree with what was shown, I'll play devils advocate for discussion sake. The biggest mistake (IMO) is how they allow the attacker to be in a close proximity to themselves. If your confronted and not grabbed, then you have the opportunity to create distance. Take a step or 2 back and then if the confronting party steps forward into your so-called neutral space, then you have the right and opportunity to employ a first strike. The other aspect noticed is that their dealing primarily with the good old round house hay maker punch and the technique offered works very well against that, but what about the straight line / jab, just won't work against that. I just find a lot of unnecessary testosterone being offered and it would not suit smaller men or women.
Reply
#4
(09-06-2016, 09:51 PM)sidekick Wrote: The other aspect noticed is that their dealing primarily with the good old round house hay maker punch and the technique offered works very well against that, but what about the straight line / jab, just won't work against that. 


What needs to be understood is that the technique/defense is designed specifically for the haymaker.   Which is why the hands are up and in front of your torso/COM which forms a barrier between you and the attacker.  Now, I'm not suggesting that it is an impenetrable barrier, but it is a barrier that presents an obstacle to the straight punch.  One that the attacker is likely to want to going around.  So in essence the hands out in front (non threatening posture on the part of the defender) force the attacker to resort to the haymaker.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#5
These remind me of a talk I heard Joe Rogan give about the difference between trained and untrained fighters. Bottom line, untrained thug hasn't a clue what they are getting into with someone who knows what they are doing. What reminded me is that these guys demonstrate intentional and forethought movement and concept, as well as an explosiveness of motion that really only training affords.

Train smart, learn to hit hard and fast.
Reply
#6
And that's the key;  don't fight the bad guys fight, make him fight yours.  That way he's the one behind the curve.  Put the hands out front in a non-threatening posture and play it up for any potential camera while simultaneously making him throw the punch you want he to throw thereby opening himself up to your already planned attack.  Almost a pre-emptive strike but you've forced him into opening himself up.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#7


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#8
(09-11-2016, 06:10 PM)Kong Soo Do Wrote:



Again we see a similar theme, that being the outside forearm against the side of the neck.  Commonly called the brachial plexus it has nerve bundles as well as blood flow to and from the brain.  A word of caution, the part of your forearm that you use as a striking point should be on the lower half of the forearm i.e. closer to the wrist than the elbow.  Two reasons for this;  first, the wrist has a nature bend that can be used to hook the neck for a follow up take down.  Second, if you go too high towards the elbow is is possible for the attacker to slip the strike and get behind you.  Not a good place to find yourself in at all.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#9


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#10


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)