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Chin Na - Wrist and arm locks - Series
#1




Discussion welcome.  If you have a comment or opinion on a specific technique demonstrated please indicate the time stamp on the video so that we can observe the portion you're talking about.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#2


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#3


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#4


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#5
(09-20-2016, 03:11 PM)Kong Soo Do Wrote:


Starting on around 5:20 My Instructor showed us this technique in Korea it is called Tiger Mouth Dragons tail. the variation we learned had the hand you have blocked and are holding turn their arm so the attackers pinky of his hand is pointing away from his body this makes it easier to pull his body weight forward with the throw however if the attacker is strong just turn into your attackers center line as you use your arm grabbing hand to come up and do a elbow strike to the attackers face much like kata with the hand elbow strikes to the head.
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#6
(09-29-2016, 09:57 PM)d_spencer Wrote:
(09-20-2016, 03:11 PM)Kong Soo Do Wrote:


Starting on around 5:20 My Instructor showed us this technique in Korea it is called Tiger Mouth Dragons tail. the variation we learned had the hand you have blocked and are holding turn their arm so the attackers pinky of his hand is pointing away from his body this makes it easier to pull his body weight forward with the throw however if the attacker is strong just turn into your attackers center line as you use your arm grabbing hand to come up and do a elbow strike to the attackers face much like kata with the hand elbow strikes to the head.


I like his point of getting out of the path of the attacker's forward momentum.  We call this 'getting off the train tracks'.  Very valid point moving on a 45 degree angle to the outside of the attacker.  I agree with his 'soft' approach to grabbing the attacker's limb.  Two different philosophies, some want to strike the attacker's outstretched limb and cause damage i.e. Okinawan karate.  And that's a valid approach if you're going to follow up with force-on-force counter-strikes to overwhelm/incapacitate the attacker.  If you're looking to seize and control the attacker then the soft approach is the best.

I've often said that I use Chin Na/Hapkido/Aiki Jujutsu style techniques 90% of the time at work and force-on-force the other 10% of the time.  Time a place for each.

In the video the presenter is Tim Cartmell.  I've talked with him briefly and he has a very good grasp on Chin Na.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#7
great videos several of the moves look like several moves used in hapkido today. what I liked most was the detailed explanations to the moves with leverage and energy.
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#8
If anyone is interested, Tim Cartmell has an excellent book called Principles, Analysis and Application of Effortless Combat Throws

[Image: 51APAWJTG4L._SX373_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg]

Extremely well written and concise.  He goes into the science of the movements and I'd recommend the book to anyone/everyone regardless of their art.  Quite a bit of good information from cover to cover.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#9


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#10


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply


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