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Knife Defense
#1
As of late, we're starting to see more knife stabbings / assaults (8 in Minn last week and there was another multi victim not that long ago but details escape me at the moment). Now we've all seen and perhaps engaged in some training in this area, but for the most part, the training was / is lacking, at least IMO. 

From my perspective, knife attacks / threats come in 3 categories. Number one, the knife being held stationary and is used as an intimidation tool as someone who is attempting to rob you. They are most likely in very close proximity or have actually grabbed you with their other hand and demanding your money. In this category, some of the often trained in techniques could / should work for a disarm, but "some" is the operative word. Number 2 is the guy looking to attack and cut you and is coming from a distance as opposed to number one. Will any of your defenses now work?..................most likely only a very limited few and at that, it depends on the individual attempting to use them. Will you get cut?...........very high probability that you will, because a blade in motion is extremely dangerous, but it can be defeated with good training and a lot of common sense. Now number 3, the never saw it coming, either from the front or the back - better known as the jail house shank. Regardless of who teaches anything that they believe will counter this type of attack, their fooling themselves and you if you think you can do anything against it. Now i will somewhat place a caveat on this and it very much depends on the type of weapon/knife/shank being used. If it's a good sized knife then you will be seriously injured or killed, but if it's a shank type - small blade or just a pointed object (screw driver or the like), then if from the frontal attack, you could respond and defend to a point were you could stop the attack and hopefully get some assistance.

Now the biggest thing I have observed, in every training video I've viewed, is the lack of taking the head of the attacker out of the equation. The head/brain is the bodies control mechanism and if that's disabled, then so is the attack. In all 3 categories, with the exception of being attacked from behind, if you counterattack the head while attempting to defend, you stand a very good chance of staying alive. Will / can you get injured? bet on it, but you can greatly minimize the degree of injury, with the right mindset and training.
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#2
A gross motor skilled response that controls the delivery system (such as grasping and holding the limb that is holding the edged weapon) while counter-attacking high % areas is the key.  I've highlighted the three key areas:


  1. Gross motor skilled response.  This doesn't include kicking the knife out of the attacker's hand or some other choreographed response with isn't going to work in real life against a violent, determined attacker.  The response has to be simple, direct and deliberate. 
  2. Control the delivery system.  Grasp and hold the attacking limb to prevent the attacker from freely using that limb.  
  3. Counter-attack a high % area.  Strike/kick/grab at areas of the body that have the highest % chance of disabling, disorienting or incapacitating the attacker in the quickest amount of time possible.  To include the temple, eyes, throat, side of neck, groin, major joints etc.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#3
As mentioned- control and counter... forget the disarms that require a high degree of training and perfect circumstances. The control and counter has a higher probability of working regardless of the type of attack. The only thing that one can hope for during an ambush is the opportunity to regain his/her composure enough to control and counter. As mentioned, this all goes back to proper mind-set rather than physical skills.

Steve
"Personal safety is a way of life, not just a hobby!" ~Steve Zorn
Personal Safety Unlimited
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#4
Unconsciousness and Death Surviving an Edged Weapon Attack Part II
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#5
Surviving an Edged Weapon Attack
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#6
Edged weapon tactics and counter tactics
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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