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Tactical pen
#1


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#2


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#3
I have a "tactical" pen as well as a 12 inch collapsible baton that I carry.
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#4
I ordered three of them off Ebay for around $7.  I'll see how they are when they arrive and post on it.  Be nice if it's actually a decent ink pen as well as I normally EDC a pen in my bag anyway for routine uses.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#5


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#6


Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#7
As a side note, you can get a good, solid pen on Ebay anywhere from less than $2 to over $20.  It's all the same so I'd go with the $2 +/- version.  I bought three of them to test out and was actually impressed.  They even wrote well.  Paid less than $6 for all three with free shipping.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


Reply
#8
"Tactical" pens are a sometimes hobby for me, going back to my Yawara stick and Kubotan days.

In earlier uniform LE days, when the obviousness of the sticks or plastic Kubotan key chains could be a potential handicap, I carried a thick bodied "capped" pen.

Back in my earlier arts days, my first instructor introduced me to the use of chopsticks as expedient weapons, as they were commonly carried and used in the parts of some of the bigger cities, such as in SF's Chinatown. As sometimes done by practitioners of one Chinese style, a chopstick was used in each hand. More or less peculiar to that style, as the hooked hands and index/middle fingers were similarly used even without the addition of chopsticks.

After an interesting thread over on another forum, I recently decided to add another few pens to both my hobby "collection" and my everyday use. One was an over-the-top appearing "Tactical Pen" (The Atomic bear Smile ), and then other one was a nicely thick Pilot Metropolitan (which will see a lot of actual writing use), as well as another couple of Zebra F301's.

The Atomic Bear will see most of its time in my collection, with some occasional use in the car for road trips.

Another interesting genre where something akin to a Yawara stick has surfaced is in the form of ... get this ... "wands" from the RPG and fantasy memorabilia crowds. On one of our visits to the PNW I came across a small collection of hand-crafted hardwood "wands" in a display case in an out-of-the-way shop that caters to gamers, steampunk and fantasy aficionados. Whoever turned these on a small lathe had more in mind that just making some thin Harry Potter prop. One of them in particular caught my eye, as it had a beautiful blond/greenish colored wood, the body was nicely shaped for gripping, with a lethal looking, turned and stubby tapered tip. Unless dressed in togs like an Elf or Gandalf, though, carrying it is just asking for trouble. Wink Collection piece.

Fun and enjoyable collection of such pens and related sticks notwithstanding, these implements really require a skillset blended with that needed for Yawara stick, effective short blade use, as well as the optional methods for employing some of the longer "needle" type shuriken spikes (meaning not throwing them).

Even the common plastic Bic type pen is handy, especially since the plastic barreled body is less susceptible to snapping than a wood pencil.

The user is the key, as with many things, right?
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