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yellow belt test
#1
So I have some family members that do karate in mustang oklahoma, the name of the school is Tori Karate. I saw on a Facebook video their yellow belt test. Im curious as to how many schools out their have the same standards for yellow belt.  For their test they had to perform three Basic H style katas and then they where asked four questions. The first was what is the meaning of the tiger and #2 what is the meaning of the dragon, #3 who is the founder of karate in America, #3 what is the name of your karate style. they then where promoted from white belt to yellow belt.  Is this something any of you have seen before, my tests for yellow belt are much much different then this.
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#2
I remember my first yellow belt test.  We were required to:
  • Perform Sanchin Kata
  • Perform Kanshiwa Kata
  • All warm ups
  • All line drills
  • Arm rubbing
  • Arm pounding
  • Leg pounding
  • Torso pounding

For yellow belt, I require:
  • All line drills w/explanation as to what each means
  • Mushin Shodan Kata w/explanation as to what each movement means along with preferred variations and conclusions
  • Counting 1-10 in Japanese
  • Explanation of what the art is all about in their own words.
  • Power pyramid of 1-5-1
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#3
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(06-30-2017, 07:14 PM)Kong Soo Do Karate Wrote: I remember my first yellow belt test.  We were required to:
  • Perform Sanchin Kata
  • Perform Kanshiwa Kata
  • All warm ups
  • All line drills
  • Arm rubbing
  • Arm pounding
  • Leg pounding
  • Torso pounding

For yellow belt, I require:
  • All line drills w/explanation as to what each means
  • Mushin Shodan Kata w/explanation as to what each movement means along with preferred variations and conclusions
  • Counting 1-10 in Japanese
  • Explanation of what the art is all about in their own words.
  • Power pyramid of 1-5-1


      Their you go look at the big difference between your test and the one I show. they didn't even half to learn how to count to ten. your test are similar to ours. thank you for your response to this question.
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#4
Yes, I have seen this and many more different things. It seems you are looking for opinions on whether this is right or not. Please correct me if this is not correct. In my opinion it is too much and at the same time lacking as well. One thing to remember is it is just a yellow belt test and defines the next stage of learning. I believe that 3 forms for yellow is too much. I have a good friend who requires 4 forms as well as other stuff for yellow be it child or adult. I believe a basic test should have basic essential material to the foundation being built. One of those being the Japanese count if it applies. Here is my test. All basics called out in korean terminology, Japanese 10 count, kihon kata, 5 basic hand combinations and 6 selfdefense techniques. Hope this helps.
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#5
Thank you for your response. I am sorta questioning if it is right or not because Im a korean martial artist's and perhaps their could be a difference in the way okinawa systems grade for yellow belt and the way we do? I suspect that is not the case its just this karate school. In the end I know every school or instructor will basically have their own standards for their students so realistically their is no wright or not standard, however my thinking is three forms to me is a little much because all three forms where performed poorly and the kids spent more time trying to do forms that they clearly where just trying to memorize rather then Knowing the form or even feeling your stances and becoming comfortable in their positions.
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#6
(07-01-2017, 01:46 PM)d_spencer Wrote: I am sorta questioning if it is right or not because Im a korean martial artist's and perhaps their could be a difference in the way okinawa systems grade for yellow belt and the way we do? I suspect that is not the case its just this karate school.  In the end I know every school or instructor will basically have their own standards...


This thread opens to discussion beyond just a yellow belt test, and that's a good thing.  I'll expand on my thoughts;

It isn't a secret that many Korean arts are nothing more than belt factories.  And truth be told, Japanese/Okinawan arts have followed, though not as large a %.  It seems in many Korean art schools you have white, yellow, orange, blue, green, purple, brown and black with stripes in-between each solid color.  Now, to be clear, there is nothing inherently wrong with that if it is needed to section out levels of training and used as a motivational tool rather than simply a $ generator.  I will admit to full bias, my 'commercial' school was not my source of income and I charged only enough to keep the doors open.  I never charged for any belt test including Dan tests.  That's just me and my situation.  If that is the instructors bread-n-butter then yes, things may need to be different.

Too much emphasis is placed on belts in the modern world.  It isn't a 'western' thing as it's that way in Korea as well.  Rare is the school that downplays belts overall.  GM Dunn (Sidekick) and I both know of an Aikido school in my area that has two belts;  white and black.  You're a white belt until you become a black belt.  They are straight-forward with this to new students...don't expect black belt for at least five years.  I know stories of 5th Dan black belts in Okinawa that still wear white belts when they train simply because they never got around to buying a black one and didn't figure it would improve their karate anyway.  Good philosophy in my opinion.

Now, there is a wisdom in giving a student small motivational stepping stones and there is nothing wrong with that.  

To expand on my original post, for yellow belts to know the basic line drills go well beyond just knowing a series of movements.  See my thread:

Advanced applications to line drills

So it's knowing a 'high block' movement, but also what it can REALLY be used for.  

Also, Mushin Shodan kata:

Mushin Shodan kata

That's the first five movements and what can be expanded on them including conclusions.  I don't see yellow belt as a simple or small stepping stone.  That's what works for me and my school and the way I teach.  I've been told by a Uechi Ryu 2nd Dan that my yellow belts know more actual karate than the black belts in his system because of the methodology of instruction.  That was a high compliment that I appreciated.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#7
Our yellow belt tests have the following components:

- Walking Drills/Basic Motions

- Forward Roll and Break Fall

- One-Steps/Entry Points

- Two Kata (Kibon 1 and Chon Ji)

- Ground Fighting (At the white-to-yellow belt level, this is a very small component)

- Sparring (Three consecutive opponents with little or no break between them. The sparring is continuous sparring with no points. Take downs, chokes, arm bars are allowed. No groin strikes, gouging, or kicking from the knee down. We do want to avoid serious injury but are also trying to simulate something closer to a street situation)

- Board Breaking (sometimes)

Our kata and ground fighting components are cumulative. Each level must perform the entire kata and ground fighting elements we have taught up to that point.
Martial Arts done well leads to a more virtuous life because everyone is fighting something.

"If your eye is single, your whole body will be full of light.  But if your eye is evil, even the light that is within you will be darkness.  If the light that is within you is darkness, how great is that darkness?"  (Jesus of Nazareth)
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#8
(07-01-2017, 08:17 PM)Conrad Wrote: Our yellow belt tests have the following components:

- Walking Drills/Basic Motions

- Forward Roll and Break Fall

- One-Steps/Entry Points

- Two Kata (Kibon 1 and Chon Ji)

- Ground Fighting (At the white-to-yellow belt level, this is a very small component)

- Sparring (Three consecutive opponents with little or no break between them.  The sparring is continuous sparring with no points.  Take downs, chokes, arm bars are allowed.  No groin strikes, gouging, or kicking from the knee down.  We do want to avoid serious injury but are also trying to simulate something closer to a street situation)

- Board Breaking (sometimes)

Our kata and ground fighting components are cumulative.  Each level must perform the entire kata and ground fighting elements we have taught up to that point.


How long before they test for this belt?
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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