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Physical requirements for black belt?
#1
Question 
Do you have physical requirements for the black belt test?  Not technical requirements such as forms, drills etc, but rather physical requirement such as push ups, running, hard body conditioning etc?
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#2
No specific requirements.  Physical conditioning is part of the training and the black belt test itself is grueling, but I do not have any specific physical requirements.

Do you think physical requirements should be embedded in the test?
Martial Arts done well leads to a more virtuous life because everyone is fighting something.

"If your eye is single, your whole body will be full of light.  But if your eye is evil, even the light that is within you will be darkness.  If the light that is within you is darkness, how great is that darkness?"  (Jesus of Nazareth)
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#3
I don't have specifics either. When you only have students for so long during class in the week, I'm a much bigger fan of letting them do basic PT at home where they don't need the expertise of an instructor. That means more time to work on the things where they do need a trained eye.

That said, the warm up for a black belt test is long and grueling. We do drills that work technique but also torch the body. So we accomplish draining the body to see how the student performs under pressure and when they are tired, but do it differently than X pushups, X sit ups, X chin ups, etc.

The last black belt test I held in June and even the most fit of the students(and this kid is fit) reported having difficulty crawling out of bed the next day. Result: Win. Smile
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#4
I like to incorporate pyramids into the testing.  I have a progression from a pyramid of 5 at yellow belt to a pyramid of 20 at black belt.  If you're not familiar with a pyramid it's actually very simple in concept.  You pick a specific number of body weight exercises.  Let's say the squat, push up and pull up.  You begin with one repetition of each and the set is over.  Then you do two of each, then three and on up to whatever your goal is for the pyramid.  So let's say your goal is 5.  It would look like this in repetitions:  1,2,3,4,5,4,3,2,1 for a total of 25 reps of each exercise.  Going up to 20 and back down would be a total of 400 reps of each exercise and is the goal for a BB.  Obviously some exercises would have to have a lesser goal such as pull ups.  But squats and push ups are definitely doable. 

Obviously injuries or disabilities are taken into consideration. 

I like to periodically do pyramids with the following exercises:

Squat
Plea squat
Lunge
Push up (using different types)
Calf raise
Pull up (using different types)
Dip
Hanging crunch

Now going 1-20-1 on some of these isn't realistic, but the goal is to go for as many as possible.
Two thousand years ago wise men sought Christ, wise men still do.

Techniques are situational, principles are universal.

Fast as the wind, quiet as the forest, aggressive as fire, and immovable as a mountain.

He who gets there first with the most...wins!

Minimal force may not be minimum force!

We don't rise to the occasion...we sink to the level of our training.


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#5
From what I can gather from the many posts on several forums, if you can physically sign the check - that's all that's needed for some schools (sarcasm intended)
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#6
We don't have any fitness requirements, the majority of our students are fitter than most anyway. They have PT as part of their job, a couple are actually PTIs. We used to have a session separate from main class just for fitness, the chap who ran it went to Afghan for six months so it was stopped, he was the Garrison Sergeant Major at Camp Bastian so made other people's lives 'interesting' for a while, he closed the place down too. Nothing like PT with the RSM lol. I now have an incredible 'library' of the most painful PT exercises devised by man.
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#7
(08-22-2015, 03:33 PM)Conrad Wrote: No specific requirements.  Physical conditioning is part of the training and the black belt test itself is grueling, but I do not have any specific physical requirements.

Do you think physical requirements should be embedded in the test?

I don't.  While overall fitness is often a byproduct of martial arts training their are frankly more effective way's to get into shape.  The best use of class time is doing martial arts, not calisthenics.  Having external aerobic and resistance training in addition to martial arts is far superior.
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#8
Very much agree Instructor. Push ups, running,etc. don't require our feedback to perform.

And to be somewhat snarky, my wife calls HapKiDo the "fat man's art". And essentially she isn't wrong. Minimum effort and maximum pain. So, in that regard, our attention is to the detail of technique. Physical fitness isn't as much a factor as sport TKD.

Nevertheless, and I think you'd agree, while we spend our class time working on what they can't do at home, we still need to push the benefit of fitness. Which for those of us teaching as a passion rather than means of income can be tricky as time tends to play a factor in how much we are able to work out! Smile
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#9
I don't test fitness at all. Obviously a certain degree of latent fitness is required but nothing more than you would normally build up with regular training. However, I do encourage people to do some form of fitness training in their own time. Our gradings are relatively short as I just want people to demonstrate their knowledge and ability within the scope of the curriculum. In earlier times a grading was conducted over two weekends which to my mind was just a flagrant money grab.
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#10
(10-14-2015, 01:56 PM)pennmartkd Wrote: Very much agree Instructor.  Push ups, running,etc. don't require our feedback to perform.  

And to be somewhat snarky, my wife calls HapKiDo the "fat man's art".   And essentially she isn't wrong.  Minimum effort and maximum pain.   So, in that regard, our attention is to the detail of technique.   Physical fitness isn't as much a factor as sport TKD.  

Nevertheless, and I think you'd agree, while we spend our class time working on what they can't do at home, we still need to push the benefit of fitness.   Which for those of us teaching as a passion rather than means of income can be tricky as time tends to play a factor in how much we are able to work out!  Smile

Yup, plenty of "fat" men out there doing Hapkido.  I highly encourage folks to get into shape and offer suggestions about some exercises that might benefit a martial artist.
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